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What to Netflix: New DVD Tuesday

All of the new DVD releases hit stores (and Netflix) on Tuesdays. So each week in What to Netflix: New DVD Tuesday, I sort through the best of the batch and tell you what to add to your queue.


1408
Just in time for scary movie season, Stephen King's summer sleeper hit 1408 is coming out on DVD! The movie quietly opened over the summer and then surprisingly became the No. 2 movie at the box office in June, coming in ahead of the Fantastic Four sequel and just behind Evan Almighty.

John Cusack plays Mike Enslin, a writer of horror fiction whose young daughter dies. He scoffs at the idea of paranormal activity and goes around discrediting allegations of ghosts and hauntings. However, when his work leads him to a haunted hotel room (number 1408) where "nobody lasts more than an hour," Mike starts to experience things he never knew were possible. Samuel L. Jackson plays the hotel manager. You can watch the preview for 1408 here.

Two more new titles so read more


The Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer
This sequel to the first Fantastic Four movie finds the superheroes battling the Silver Surfer, a liquidy metallic guy who can change matter and who apparently "eats planets." Apparently, "Everywhere this thing goes, eight days later, the planet dies." The trailer includes a lot of flashy computer animation and Jessica Alba using her superpowers in her wedding dress. Special features include extended and deleted scenes and some behind-the-scenes featurettes, including one about the comic book origins of the Silver Surfer.


Civic Duty
Civic Duty, which stars Peter Krause as a man who becomes convinced that his neighbor is a terrorist, is far from the most subtle movie I've ever seen. But the paranoia-fueled thriller is still an interesting look at race, prejudice and presumption in post-Sept. 11 society. When I interviewed Krause last year, he told me he pushed to get the movie made because he felt the artistic community hadn't weighed in enough on the effects of terrorist attacks on the average American's state of mind. That's an ambitious goal for a small movie, but it's definitely good for sparking a discussion.


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